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Redundancy

Redundancy: Everything You Need To Know If You’ve Lost Your Job

SEVEN CEO and Founder, Evelyn Cotter was recently asked about redundancy, mental health and searching the job market by Refinery29 and here's what she said:

When dealing with redundancy, Evelyn suggests having a mental health 'regroup' - this can in turn help your career search:

"I see so many people who literally go through a grieving process and that is perfectly natural, your identity and sense of security has been threatened. That’s why you need to go through the whole thing and take stock. Lots of people aren’t prepared for redundancy. I know that action feels better than inaction – but it’s no good if your actions lack strategy. Even just a week is worth taking. 

 
"It’s a real moment for people to take a step back from the hamster wheel of what they were doing and work out what they really want."

 

When do I tell people I've been made redundant?

Confronting your new position of redundancy and letting other people know about it, her advice is to let it all out if you need to, but also to create some clarity around it all:

"By all means vent to your friends with a glass of wine," says Evelyn but when it comes to prospective new employers, "I would say don’t be an open book. People like someone to be honest but be wary of being too open about what’s happened. I find people fare best being open about losing their job when they have traction and a clear idea about where they are going next." She continues: "Can you reframe your redundancy in your own head? Your brain is likely naturally leaning towards the negative but right now you’ll need to brainwash yourself positively. If you own the narrative about it not being the right job for you, you are clear to start new beginnings."

 

The obvious next steps after redundancy:

It might seem daunting at first, but starting the new career search is also exciting! Start small, create a network, seek people out using platforms like LinkedIN. The advice from career expert Evelyn is:

"Have a strategy – build up to it – be up to date with what they are doing. Find some people whose careers you admire and whose work you admire. Shortlist them and find a way to them – maybe a 15-20 minute coffee or Zoom call. The natural goodwill of people to help someone out is so often underestimated by my clients."

 

If you're looking for a job search strategy, clarity on your next steps, personal branding, networking or career change - let one of our expert coaches guide you through

 

SEVEN Career Coaching is proud to be London's market leader in career coaching. Helping clients create satisfying careers since 2009, we work with a diverse range of ambitious professionals at all career stages. Helping clients make successful career changes since 2009, we are consistently the highest rated on Google.

 

Read the full article here.